High School

High School Academics

Advanced Studies

Honors Logic II - Grade 9
This course introduces informal logic as an application of sound reasoning to real world polemics.  The students familiarize themselves with informal fallacies like ad baculum and ad hominem and develop skills in recognizing weak reasoning in various contemporary media. After criticizing the reasoning of others, students are required to produce written arguments in favor of their own personally held beliefs.  

Honors Rhetoric I - Grade 10
Rhetoric I is modeled upon the first two canons of ancient Roman and Greek rhetorical treatises.  The students are taught the two concepts of invention and arrangement.  That is, they are taught to develop an idea, and to arrange it for delivery or writing.  The focus of this class is learning to develop one’s ideas properly, so that concepts can be presented forcefully, logically, and persuasively.

In addition, the students are taught to construct three types of appeals: ethical, emotional, and logical.  In learning the logical mode of persuasion, the students review and expand upon what they learned in logic class.  The three types of discourse are then taught, along with their uses: ceremonial discourse, or present time orations; political, or deliberative proposals; and judicial, or past time analyses. Lastly, the system of “topics,” in which the students gain the means to categorize and analyze any idea, is presented.

Honors Rhetoric II - Grade 11
Rhetoric II is based on the third canon of Greek rhetorical training, the canon of style.  This course does not simply give the students dressings or embellishments for their writing, but actually trains the students to choose the appropriate words and means of communication for any idea and any audience.  Consequently, much time is spent discussing diction, sentence length, sentence structure, and figures of speech.  The goal is that the students vastly enlarge their ability to use the English language, and understand when and why to use various types of style.

Honors Philosophy - Grade 12
Philosophy provides a chronological survey of the major thinkers and schools of thought in the Western tradition.   Beyond proving an introduction to the basic ideas and contributions of the influential philosophers in the Western tradition, the course analyzes the presuppositions, strengths, and weaknesses of each thinker and how each thinker fits into a Biblical worldview. 

 

English

World Literature I and Honors World Literature I - Grade 9
These courses are designed to expose students to some of the oldest, most influential non-English language literature in Western civilization. A variety of genres will be included, but drama will be the dominant genre studied. These works will be read, discussed, and analyzed.  In addition, vocabulary from the literary works will be learned and reinforced. Basic grammatical aspects of language (punctuation, spelling, fragments) will be addressed and mastered.  Attention to the relevancy of the Christian paradigm in regard to language will permeate class discourse, and a specific book directly related to this issue will be studied and discussed.

World Literature and Honors World Literature II - Grade 10
These courses are designed to expose students to some of the most influential non-English language literature of Western civilization.   A variety of genres will be included, but short stories will be the dominant genre studied. These works will be read, discussed, and analyzed.  In addition, vocabulary from the literary works will be learned and reinforced.  Intermediate aspects of language structure (agreement, tense/usage problems) will be addressed and mastered.  Attention to the relevancy of the Christian paradigm to literature will permeate class discourse, and a specific book directly related to this issue will be studied and discussed.

American Literature - Grade 11
This course is designed to expose students to some of the most important American literature. A variety of genres will be studied. These works will be read, discussed, and analyzed.  In addition, vocabulary from the literary works will be learned and reinforced. More advanced aspects of language usage (revision, effectiveness, research writing) will be addressed and mastered, with additional attention given to more intermediate aspects of language in need of review.  Attention to the relevancy of the Christian paradigm to literature will permeate class discourse, and a specific book directly related to this issue will be studied and discussed.

Advanced Placement Language - Grade 11
Most of the core texts covered in this class will be the same as those covered in American Literature; however, a particular focus on the rhetorical aspects of those works will be addressed.  The essay genre will be the focus of this class, with additional essays being read and closely analyzed. In addition to vocabulary from the literature, rhetorical terms of relevance to literary analysis will be mastered.

Various exercises will be done that prepare the students for the rigors of the AP Language Exam. Success on the exam itself is not the end goal; rather, the student will grow in their ability to identify and critique rhetorical elements of writing, and a successful AP exam will simply serve as a demonstration of that ability.

British Literature - Grade 12
This course is designed to expose students to some of the most important literature in the English language from the British/Irish/Scottish tradition. A variety of genres will be studied.  These works will be read, discussed, and analyzed. In addition, vocabulary from the literary works will be learned and reinforced.  Knowledge of the mechanics of language will be assumed, and more advanced aspects of language (style, simplicity, unity) will be addressed and mastered.  Attention to the relevancy of the Christian paradigm to literature will permeate class discourse, and a specific book directly related to this issue will be studied and discussed.

Advanced Placement Literature - Grade 12
Most of the core texts covered in this class will be similar to those covered in British Literature; however, a particular focus on the intricate literary aspects of those works will be addressed.  Poetry will be the focus of this class.  In addition to vocabulary from the literature, literary terms of relevance to in-depth analysis will be mastered.   Various exercises will be done that prepare the students for the rigors of the AP Literature Exam. Success on the exam itself is not the end goal; rather, the student will grow in their ability to identify and critique complex literary elements of language, and a successful AP exam will simply serve as a demonstration of that ability.

 

History

Western Civilizations I and Honors Western Civilization I - Grade 9
These survey courses cover the first part of the development of Western Civilization, beginning with Mesopotamia and concluding with the state of Europe in the Late Middle Ages.  The students consider the social, political, economic, geographic, religious, and technological aspects of the development of Europe.  The Hebrew people, Greece, Rome, the development of Christianity, medieval Europe, and the Hundred Years’ War are examined and analyzed.  The goal of these courses is to engage students in a conversation regarding the nature of God’s active involvement in history.  A textbook is used as a principle resource, along with primary documents, films, and maps.

Western Civilizations I and Honors Western Civilization II - Grade 10
These survey courses cover the study of Europe, beginning with the Late Middle Ages.  They focus on the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the buildup to World War I and World War II, and the impact of Europe in global affairs.  As in Western Civilization I, a principle text is used, accompanied by primary documents and maps.  An emphasis is placed on critical writing and analysis.

Advanced Placement United States History - Grade 11
AP US History is a college level course that trains students to develop essential critical thinking ability.  Students in this class must be individually motivated and disciplined.  The course covers the major themes of United States history from its origins in the colonial era through the events of current American life.  Students use a textbook in addition to primary documents, charts, and maps to develop familiarity with significant American events from the Revolution through the Cold War and beyond.  The ability to analyze documents and to clearly express thinking in essay form is a major focus of the course.

United States Government and Advanced Placement United States Government - Grade 12
Developing a better understanding of and interest in the past, present, and future workings of the United States political system enables students to actively analyze their nation's changing role in world affairs and their own future role as responsible citizens.  Students study the development of American political culture and institutions of government, the influence of citizens, political parties, interest groups, the mass media, the inter-workings of public policy, and the changing understanding of civil rights and civil liberties.   AP United States Government prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam through readings, lectures, class discussion, written assignments, research projects, and weekly practice quizzes covering the formation of the constitution and the federal system of government.

 

Foreign Language

Latin I - Grade 9
This course has been designed for students who have not completed our Middle School Latin program and will only be taking one year of Latin. It is a condensed, fast paced study of Latin grammar.  The course includes all five declensions of nouns, both declensions of adjectives, and all tenses, moods, and voices of verbs.  Ablative constructions, direct and indirect questions, adverbial and adjectival dependent clauses, and various pronouns are also included. The grammar-translation method of instruction is used.  Students at course end will have a strong ability to translate Latin passages whose vocabulary is tailored to their limited knowledge.

Honors Latin II - Grade 9
The purpose of Latin III is to complete the study of typical Classical Latin grammatical concepts, gain experience in translating Latin sentences and paragraphs, increase the vocabulary of the students to approximately 500 words, and ultimately prepare the students for Honors Latin IV.

Honors Latin III - Grade 10
The goal of the Honors Latin IV class is simple:  prepare the students for AP Latin Virgil.  In order to accomplish this, the students spend the year learning to transform their grammatical skills into reading skills.  They learn significant portions of Virgil's vocabulary, review all important grammatical concepts, and most importantly, begin reading significant amounts of Classical Latin.

Advanced Placement Latin - Grade 11
The goals of this course center around the requirements for the Advanced Placement Latin Virgil exam.  Those requirements dictate that students have read 1,856 lines of Virgil's Aeneid, be competent in the grammar of Classical Latin, be able to read and analyze basic sight passages, be able to discuss and identify a significant list of classical figures of speech, and be able to meaningfully write essays on the entirety of the Aeneid.  This course particularly emphasizes the ability to read Latin in Latin word order, analyze the style and discuss the grammatical features found in all passages, and competently write about and discuss the various themes and characters introduced by Virgil.

Spanish I - Grade 10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           This course has been designed to introduce students to basic grammar and vocabulary.  The method is conversational with heavy emphasis on the structure of the Spanish language.  Interrogatives, agreement of adjectives, possession, articles, negation, ser and estar, and regular and irregular verbs are all mastered in this first year course.  Students are expected to become proficient in reading, writing, listening, and speaking utilizing first-year knowledge.  The nature of the subject lends itself to lively discussion of the Hispanic culture and history within the Biblical worldview.

Spanish II - Grade 11
The student's knowledge of basic grammar is expanded in this course.  The imperfect, preterit, and conditional tenses are emphasized. The conversational method is continued throughout the year.  Students are expected to attain a higher level of verbal proficiency during this second year course.  More emphasis is placed on the spoken word, with lessons focusing on idioms and translation.

Honors Spanish III - Grade 12
This course is the capstone Spanish course.  Although the conversational method continues to be employed, the students move from reading for comprehension to reading for evaluation.  Through study of Hispanic authors and poets, the students learn elevated grammatical constructions such as compound tenses and que clauses.  Vocabulary is learned more independently while grammar remains a central lesson topic.  Students write several papers in Spanish and are expected to converse easily on most topics.

 

Mathematics

Algebra I - Grade 9
Algebra I is a course where the abstract becomes real, where symbols take the place of numbers, and the process of thinking becomes as important as the answer.  Algebra I accomplishes this by working with mathematical expressions that have no determinable value or equation whose sole purpose is to train the mind.  Once basic skills have been developed, the student discovers that life can be represented in symbols, and solutions can be found by manipulating equations employing clearly stated rules.  The processes learned in this course prepare a student for a course in Geometry or Algebra II and open up a whole new way to look at the world.

Algebra II- A Study of Functions - Grades 9 or 11
Algebra II is a course designed primarily as an intermediate study of algebraic functions with an introduction to trigonometry.  In correlation to the four State Education Board competency goals, the learner will have the opportunity to engage in activities such as using number operations with polynomials to solve problems, describing geometric figures algebraically in a coordinate plane, using functions to solve problems, as well as collecting, organizing, and interpreting data with best-fit functions and matrices. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to explore trigonometric ideas.  The course aims to significantly increase the student’s number sense, spatial sense, and measurement and numerical operation ability.  The course also teaches a student how to obtain mathematical data from an application or model and how to create an application or model from mathematical data.

Geometry and Honors Geometry - Grade 10
Geometry, more than any other branch of mathematics explains the properties of all that we see around us.  Geometry also trains the mind in logical thinking skills that enable the student to extend obvious properties to real, though less obvious, properties that can withstand intense scrutiny.  In addition, this subject also provides an excellent forum for discussing connections among branches of mathematics and expectations of future courses in mathematics.

Honors Pre-Calculus - Grade 11
This course provides preparation for a student seeking to take Calculus.  Topics from earlier courses in math are revisited and expanded, especially in the area of using new technology.  New concepts are presented, especially if they have a direct application to what will be studied in Calculus.  Additional topics covering a wide range are presented for those students who will not be following the Calculus track.

Advanced Functions and Modeling - Grade 12
This course builds upon the knowledge of functions acquired in Algebra, specifically investigating fundamentals and applications of circular and trigonometric functions.  Additionally, the course provides an introduction to the fundamentals and applications of statistics. Functions and Modeling is designed for students who wish to continue in a fourth year of math but do not desire to take AP Calculus.

AP Calculus AB - Grade 12
This course provides complete coverage of the topics tested on the AP Calculus AB exam.  Three main topics are emphasized and intertwined during this course.  Functions are represented in a variety of ways:  graphical, numerical, analytical, and verbal.  Derivatives are presented as limits of rates of change.  Definite integrals are shown as sums of rates of change.  Students are expected to be able to model a given situation as a function, a differential equation, or an integral.

 

Science

Biology - Grade 9
Biology is an introductory survey course.  This course offers students the opportunity to learn about the fundamental topics in the study of living organisms including cell biology, classification, ecology, and diversity. Study begins with an introduction to chemistry, followed by an analysis of cell structure, biological levels of organization, ecology, the interdependence of organisms, theories of adaptation and evolution, classification and taxonomy, microbiology, and plant and animal biology.  Students will examine a broad range of general topics through class discussions, lectures, readings, group or individual projects and laboratory activities.

Honors Biology - Grade 9
Honors Biology is a comprehensive biology course provided for college preparatory students who have shown strong aptitude for the study of science. The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the chemical, functional, and structural characteristics of living organisms.  Through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory experiences, the student develops an understanding of the interactions that exist between living organisms and their environment.  Topics studied include chemistry, cell theory, genetics, plant and animal physiology, reproduction, metabolism and cellular energy.  Laboratory work is designed to develop an understanding of the scientific process, as well as an understanding of biological concepts.  Fall and Spring semesters are designed around two significant investigation projects that will encourage the student to seek out, collect and research organisms indigenous to the southern Appalachians. Skills practiced are project planning, organization, and attention to detail while applying a working knowledge of taxonomic identification.

Chemistry and Honors Chemistry - Grade 10
Honors Chemistry is an in-depth study of chemical principles and concepts. Some of the topics covered include atomic structure, the periodic chart, chemical bonds, chemical equations, stoichiometry, gases, thermodynamics, solution chemistry, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. In addition to lecture, the course includes laboratories to emphasize concepts learned in class and improve basic laboratory skills. The course requires that the student be proficient in basic algebra as well as problem solving.

Conceptual Physics - Grade 11
This course provides the student with a general introduction to physical concepts, covering the fundamentals of mechanics, properties of materials, heat, light, sound, electricity, and magnetism. The course is designed for students who do not wish to pursue studies in physical sciences or engineering and requires that the student be proficient in basic algebra.

Honors Physics - Grade 11
Honors Physics is an advanced-level Newtonian physics course with a strong emphasis on data analysis and problem-solving. Students enrolled in Honors Physics should have a strong interest in science, possess strong math (geometry, trigonometry and algebra) skills and an intrinsic curiosity concerning natural processes.  The course includes a study of mechanics, light and ray optics, waves, and an introduction to electricity. This course provides students a platform to develop an awareness, appreciation and understanding of the natural world’s energy and motion.  Related items stressed in this course include the philosophy and nature of science, scientific method, history of physics, technology, and scientific inquiry. Algebra II is a prerequisite to Honors Physics.

AP Biology - Grade 11 or 12
The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. This course is offered to students upon successful completion of a first course in both biology and chemistry.  It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and the analytical skills necessary to critically examine the rapidly changing science of biology.  AP Biology includes a strong lab component, including twelve lab topics endorsed by the College Board.  The course is designed for motivated students who have an interest in knowing more about and pursuing post-secondary degrees in the sciences. Concepts covered in AP Biology will serve to prepare the student for the AP Biology Exam given each spring.  All students must take the AP Exam in order to receive AP Biology credit.

AP Chemistry - Grade 11 or 12
Advanced Placement Chemistry is an exciting and rigorous secondary chemistry course.  This course provides students a platform to develop an awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the natural world that surrounds them.  This course includes many of the key aspects of college level chemistry including a strong lab component.  The course is designed for motivated students who have an interest in knowing more about and pursuing post-secondary degrees in the sciences.  Concepts covered in AP Chemistry will serve to prepare students for the AP Chemistry exam given in the spring.  Students are expected to take the AP exam.

 

Theology

Doctrine I - Grade 9
Major doctrines of the Christian faith are studied using the book of Romans as a foundation. Chapters 1-6 are analyzed verse by verse and doctrines are pulled out to observe and apply Paul’s message. Theological topics include inerrancy of scripture, incarnation, trinity, resurrection, sin, federal headship, righteousness, salvation, general antinomianism, justification, propitiation, imputation and reconciliation. The text used in this course is the book of Romans.

Doctrine II - Grade 10
Major doctrines of the Christian faith are studied using the book of Romans as a foundation. Chapters 7-16 are analyzed verse by verse and doctrines are pulled out to observe and apply Paul’s message. Theological topics include the two natures, flesh/spirit, law, mercy and justice of God, bondservants, walking in the Spirit, basic Christology, Holy Spirit, adoption, assurance of salvation, perseverance of the saints, regeneration, mortification, suffering, kingdom of God, already but not yet of the kingdom, creation, effectual/general calling, election, predestination, foreknowledge, providence, sacrificial system, Old Testament covenant, Gentile/Jew relationship, the remnant, spiritual gifts, church/state, and Christian freedom. The text used in this course is the book of Romans.

Apologetics - Grade 11
This course is intended to expose the student to various objections to the Christian faith, to philosophies of the past that have shaped how cultures have come to know and believe certain things, and to the worldviews that currently represent the mindset of contemporary culture. This course encounters ways to test competing religious truth claims with the objective of defending biblical truth in the competing marketplace of religious ideas. Apologetics develops a consistently biblical worldview that defends and nurtures faith in God and enables the student to become a more faithful witness to the truth.